2010 Midterm Elections

The Media on Blacks and the 2010 Midterm Elections

Blacks, Latinos agree racism a ‘major problem,’ whites say no

Stefano Esposito, Chicago Sun-Times | October 23, 2010

Nearly two years after the nation elected its first black president, Americans remain deeply divided on how big of a problem racism is, a new survey finds, with most blacks and Latinos saying it’s a “major problem” and most whites saying it’s not.

Sixty-nine percent of African Americans and 51 percent of Latinos said they consider racism a “major problem,” according to the findings of the University of Chicago study released last week.

That compares with 29 percent of whites and 32 percent of Asian Americans.

That “polarization” suggests that President Obama needs to do more to bridge that gap, said Cathy J. Cohen, a U. of C. political science professor who was one of the survey’s lead investigators.  (Read more)

Study skewers black youth stereotypes

UPI | October 20, 2010

CHICAGO, Oct. 20 (UPI) — The younger generation of African-Americans is serious about politics and somewhat skeptical of rap music, results of a study released Tuesday reveal.

The report issued by the University of Chicago was based on surveys and interviews and concluded black youth are by no means apathetic, can be socially conservative, and are turned off by negative messages contained in rap lyrics and videos.

Professor Cathy Cohen, the lead researcher of the study and author of a book based on its results, “Democracy Remixed, Black Youth and the Future of American Politics,” said the research should clear up various “half truths” about the African-American community and its role in American politics.  (Read more)

Why the ‘Obama Effect’ is waning

Emily Wilensky, WBEZ Chicago Public Radio | October 20, 2010

In his 2008 presidential candidacy, Barack Obama energized youth voters in the black and Latino communities like no                     other candidate before him. They worked hard for his campaign, and in record numbers young people of color also turned               out to vote for Obama. While their efforts may have tipped the election in his favor, they haven’t been as politically active                 in the run-up to this year’s mid-term elections. To find out why the power of the so-called “Obama Effect” is dwindling we               speak with Cathy Cohen. (Listen)

Black youth are politically involved, shows study

Newstrack India | October 20, 2010

Washington, Oct 20 (ANI): A new study by University of Chicago has shown that conception about black youth that they are politically detached and negatively influenced by rap music and videos are completely false.

Black youth say they are politically involved, critical of many messages in rap and skeptical of the idea that the country has entered a post-racial era.

They also are socially conservative on issuess such same-sex marriage, said Prof. Cathy Cohen, the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science and lead researcher of the study.

Using survey questions and focus group discussions, the study provides new insights into a youth culture often criticized and frequently misunderstood.  (Read more)

Study shows black youth are politically involved, disputes other stereotypes

Phys Org | October 19, 2010

Many of the assumptions people have about black youth? That they are politically detached and negatively influenced by rap music and videos?are false stereotypes, according to a new University of Chicago study by Prof. Cathy Cohen, based on surveys and conversations with the youth themselves.

Black youth say they are politically involved, critical of many messages in rap and skeptical of the idea that the country has entered a post-racial era. They also are socially conservative on political issues such same-sex marriage, said Cohen, the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science and lead researcher of the study.

Using survey questions and focus group discussions, the study provides new insights into a youth culture often criticized and frequently misunderstood. The study comes as attitudes among black youth are being examined in light of the election of President Barack Obama, which brought hope as well as disappointment for people who expected more change, she said.  (Read more)

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Do Appearances on BET & MTV really engage young people in the Election process?

Politics from the eyes of an ebony mom

This afternoon had the opportunity to sit in on a conference call sponsored by the Mobilization, Change and Political and Civic Engagement Project (MCPCE). They took the opportunity to reveal their findings from a national survey which examined the changing attitudes of blacks, whites, Asians and Latinos regarding race, politics, immigration and more. The chief researcher Dr. Cathy Cohen served as the moderator. If you are interested in reviewing the research you can do so at www.2008andbeyond.com. (Read more)